Culture and Communities Curriculum Scheme 2020-21

Autumn A – My Environment [Geography | History | RE]
Sensory Experience Intentional Skill Development Functional Skills Applied Skills
  • Experience being in own environment e.g. reach towards objects, touch various textures.
  • Use senses to explore the immediate environment.
  • Shows response to sudden noises or movement e.g. tenses body.
  • Experience their daily routine e.g. reaches towards objects of reference and listens to cue songs.
  • Listen to and experience sensory stories and music about creation and caring for the world
  • Experience daily collective worship.
  • Experience a range of celebrations and significant times.
  • Actively look around own environment such as their classroom.
  • Begin to explore the outdoor environment e.g. playground, forest school.
  • Reacts to unfamiliar and familiar experiences e.g. looks for source of light or sound.
  • Shows an awareness of familiar daily routines e.g. moves towards the door for lunchtime.
  • Responds to familiar and unfamiliar objects relating to own culture.
  • Responds to daily collective worship.
  • Responds to familiar religious music.
  • Explore and respond to a range of activities/media relating to celebrations and significant times.
  • Notice objects and specific features of environment e.g. helicopter, tree, slide etc.
  • Use equipment correctly e.g. spade for digging soil, brush for sweeping etc.
  • Identify own family members and important people in their lives.
  • Responds to daily routine e.g. Helps to tidy resources away.
  • Responds and makes comments when they see objects or photos of an event or experience that has happened to them.
  • Special to me – my special things
  • Special to my class/school – class/school song, school badge, …
  • Actively participates in daily collective worship.
  • Actively participates in celebrations and significant events, able to name keywords and give key features.
  • Find specific landmarks when asked or by following a simple map e.g. church, tree etc.
  • Follow a simple map around the school and forest school area to find objects or key areas. Navigate around trees and obstacles to find an object.
  • Help to tidy equipment away after sessions. Keep indoor and outdoor areas clean and tidy.
  • Is able to answer simple question about past events that have happened in their life.
  • Shows anticipation of routine e.g. anticipates tidy up time and starts to tidy away resources.
  • Shows interest in artefacts and symbols linked to Christianity (the cross, the font) + others for example in context when visiting places of worship.
  • Able to talk about celebrations and significant events in their own lives and identify symbols, artefacts etc. associated with the events.
  • Develops positive attitudes about the differences between people.
  • Can label and talk about features of their own and wider environment, including their favourite places and objects (inside and outside of the classroom).
  • Can look after their immediate environment e.g. tidy toys away, weeding the forest school area, litter picking, recycling etc.
  • Draw information from a simple map.
  • Talk about members of their immediate family and community.
  • Is able to talk about past and present events that have happened in their life.
  • Can talk about their daily routine e.g. this morning I am… this afternoon I will …..
  • Describe ways in which we can see those religious artefacts and places are significant
  • Make connections between a religious community, its objects and the beliefs that go with them.
  • Discuss, explain and answer questions re the importance and value of celebrations and significant events and how this makes them feel.

 

Autumn B – My Community [Geography | History | RE]
Sensory Experience Intentional Skill Development Functional Skills Applied Skills
  • Experience being in own community e.g. access shops, cafes, routine appointments etc.
  • Experience different cultures and ways of living through celebrations and stories.
  • Experience being in their own community e.g. school community, local parks, places of worship and shops.
  • Experience being in different locations and visit different types of buildings e.g. local, historical buildings and places of worship.
  • Experience of self and being special e.g. using mirrors to look at own individual faces.
  • Experience a range of celebrations and significant times.
  • Access a range of places within the community and begin to show interest.
  • Actively explore small world toys and home corner equipment g. car garage, train track etc.
  • Reacts to new experiences in the community e.g. turns their attention towards new smells, sounds and objects.
  • Shows an interest in new environments and surroundings e.g. reaching out to touch new materials.
  • Shows an interest in special people – family and friends.
  • Explore and respond to a range of activities / media relating to celebrations and significant times.
  • Able to label own community and its key features e.g. town, village, neighbourhood.
  • Able to label people, places and vehicles within the local community.
  • Actively explores new environments for an extended period.
  • Introduction to faith leaders and founders through stories etc.
  • Roleplay places of worship e.g. building a lego mosque; small world nativity scene, playdoh to make
  • Making dens and tents.
  • Talk about somewhere that is special to themselves.
  • Be aware that some places and things have special meaning and are valued by others.
  • Actively participates in celebrations and significant events, able to name key words and give key features.
  • Identify or sort objects relating to own community e.g. houses, buildings, parks and what objects may be contained within them e.g. bed, slide, till etc.
  • Can identify locations or buildings previously visited and re-call what they did or how they felt.
  • Exploring children’s beliefs and practices and those of their families, including visits to and visitors from places of worship.
  • Recall and name elements of different beliefs and practices such as festivals, ways of life.
  • Retell some religious and moral stories.
  • Recognises some different symbols and actions of different communities ways of life.
  • Recognise a place of worship.
  • Identify some significant features of sacred places.
  • Able to talk about celebrations and significant events in their own lives  and identify symbols, artefacts etc. associated with the events.
  • Independently use facilities in the community e.g. using money to buy groceries, order food at a café etc.
  • Talk about similarities and differences within the community and how they might vary from other communities.
  • They begin to know about their own cultures and beliefs and those of other people.
  • Talk about previous visits and how buildings or landmarks look e.g. do they look old or new, do they look cold or warm?
  • Can talk about the similarities and differences of locations and buildings that they have visited including buildings from the past and present, including places of worship.
  • Find out about and investigate key concepts and questions of belonging, expressing own ideas and opinions through words, music, art, or stories.
  • Has basic understanding of what is important in their own and other people’s lives.
  • Get to know and use appropriate words to talk about their thoughts and feelings when visiting a place of worship.
  • Discuss, explain and answer questions re the importance and value of celebrations and significant events and how this makes them feel.
Spring A – Around the World [Geography | History | RE]
Sensory Experience Intentional Skill Development Functional Skills Applied Skills
  • Experiences different places/ customs whilst listening to traditional music, tasting traditional food or handling traditional objects.
  • Experiences sensory stories relating to different countries, cultures and religions.
  • Experiences different music, smells and objects from different time periods and parts of the world.
  • Experience a range of celebrations and significant times.
  • Shows an interest in other cultures by looking at objects or reaching towards them.
  • Listen to stories or factual information with interest, including stories from different, communities, cultures and religions.
  • Listens to stories about people from the past (from different places around the world).
  • Explore and respond to a range of activities / media relating to celebrations and significant times.
  • Listens to stories with interest about different countries and cultures.
  • Handles objects with interest when exploring objects from different countries and cultures.
  • Actively explores sensory trays and handles objects with interest relating to the stories they have heard.
  • Actively participates in celebrations and significant events, able to name key words and give key features.
  • Identify different families from across the world and how they live.
  • Listen to stories about people and places from across the world and answer simple questions.
  • Uses words and phrases related to a specific religion
  • Uses words and phrases related to religion in general.
  • Can identify different people from the past and answer simple questions about them including how and where they lived.
  • Able to talk about celebrations and significant events in their own lives and identify symbols, artefacts etc. associated with the events.
  • Identify and talk about different places around the world, discussing their similarities and differences e.g. food, clothing, weather, language etc.
  • Identify and explore objects that help us understand the wider world e.g. maps, globes, atlases etc.
  • Asks questions about the wider world.
  • Know some similarities and differences between different religions and communities in this country, drawing on own experiences and from stories read to them.
  • Explain some similarities and differences between life in this country and life in other countries, drawing on knowledge from stories, non-fiction texts and – when appropriate – maps.
  • Can recall some information about people from the past encountered in books they have read in class including where and how they lived.
  • Explore and find out about places and objects that matter in different cultures and beliefs.
  • Discuss, explain and answer questions re the importance and value of celebrations and significant events and how this makes them feel.
Spring B – People who help us [Geography | History | RE]
Sensory Experience Intentional Skill Development Functional Skills Applied Skills
  • Experiences different occupations through visits from professionals e.g. firefighter, police etc. or by visiting local police stations and fire stations within the community.
  • Listen to sensory stories about people in the community who help us.
  • Listen to sensory bible stories for example Noah, the good Samaritan.
  • Listen to stories about people from the past and present who helped others. E.g. Florence Nightingale
  • Experience a range of celebrations and significant times.
  • Actively explore the role play area of the classroom/resources available.
  • Listen to stories, reaching out to access resources relating to people who help in the community.
  • Explore story boxes relating to bible stories e.g. Noah’s ark;
  • Actively explores resources and looks at pictures of individuals who helped others with interest.  
  • Explore and respond to a range of activities / /media relating to celebrations and significant times.
  • Use the role play area of the classroom/ resources available to experience different occupations e.g. dressing up, identifying which person needs particular equipment in order to do their job.
  • Play simple games such as follow the leader, ‘Simon says’ and think and talk about following a lead, and following instructions – we all follow leaders sometimes. Examples from sports, school or family life can be talked about along with an example of a religious leader: Jesus, Moses or Guru Nanak. These leaders had followers called ‘disciples’ – it is just another word for ‘follower’.
  • Uses role play and available resources to re-enact the roles others played to help people. E.g. dresses up as a nurse and bandages up a doll.
  • Actively participates in celebrations and significant events, able to name key words and give key features.
  • Identify people in the community who help them and match them to their vehicles.
  • Able to answer simple questions relating to people in the community based on their knowledge and experience.
  • Explore how and why religious people in the local community help others through the work that they do. Invite someone from a charity or The Salvation Army to talk about how they care for the less fortunate – support others with food parcels etc.
  • Can answer simple questions about people (past and present) and how they helped others e.g. could use photos and objects as prompts
  • Able to talk about celebrations and significant events in their own lives and identify symbols, artefacts etc. associated with the events.
  • Can talk to people in the community and ask for help when needed e.g. shop assistant.
  • Explain what different jobs people do in the community and how they can help them e.g. police, firefighters etc.
  • Able to explain what an emergency is and who to contact.
  • Recognise that religious beliefs can have an effect on what people do and feel; communicate questions, feelings and thoughts about God, people and the world.
  • Can talk about individuals (past and present) and the role they play in society and how they help people.
  • Compares and talks about the similarities and differences in the tool’s and appearance of people who help us (past – present) e.g. Compare Florence Nightingale’s uniform to present day nurses’ uniform.
  • Discuss, explain and answer questions re the importance and value of celebrations and significant events and how this makes them feel.
Summer A – Traditional Tales [Geography | History | RE]
Sensory Experience Intentional Skill Development Functional Skills Applied Skills
  • Experience sensory stories relating to traditional tales.
  • Experience sensory stories relating to traditional; bible stories.
  • Experience a range of celebrations and significant times.
  • Experience sensory stories relating to traditional tales.
  • Listens to stories relating to traditional tales.
  • Handles a range of objects when listening to sensory stories relating to traditional tales.
  • Explore sensory stories relating to traditional bible stories.
  • Explore and respond to a range of activities / media relating to celebrations and significant times.
  • Explores sensory bins relating to traditional tales handling objects with interest. Watches short videos relating to traditional tales with interest.
  • Navigate characters around an imaginary setting.
  • Explore stories through play, role play, model making, puppets, art, dance, music etc.
  • Actively participates in celebrations and significant events, able to name key words and give key features.
  • Introduced to important stories of long away, written, recorded in different ways such as scrolls, painting on buildings, stained glass windows, sacred books.
  • Able to re-tell stories using wooden spoons, story stones, props, hand puppets, and art.
  • Is introduced to the idea traditional tales are stories from a long time ago.
  • Can label key characters of each story and their key equipment needed to live in their location.
  • Able to label the location of stories and buildings e.g. cottage, castle etc.
  • Answer simple questions about their experiences in response to stories.
  • Able to retell bible stories and identify aspects they like.
  • Able to talk about celebrations and significant events in their own lives and identify symbols, artefacts etc. associated with the events.
  • Able to name key words such as bible, scroll etc. and answer simple questions relating to stories of long ago.
  • Can identify which story is a traditional tale from a choice of two
  • Correctly identify different locations relating to traditional tales and their characters. Able to discuss why certain characters live in certain locations.
  • Abel to talk about likes and dislikes relating to locations of familiar stories.
  • Identify simple compass points when exploring simple maps in stories.
  • Talk about some religious and traditional stories, using some religious words, e.g. about God.
  • Identify some of their own feelings in response to the stories they hear, including the moral of the story, what is right and wrong.
  • Talk about what key religious leaders teach, for example Jesus saying thank you,
  • Discuss, explain and answer questions re the importance and value of celebrations and significant events and how this makes them feel.
  • Is able to recall some important narratives and characters from stories they have read or heard in class.
  • Is able to explain which traditional tale is their favourite and why.
  • Is able to explain what a traditional tale is.
Summer B – Animals and Seasons [Geography | History | RE]
Sensory Experience Intentional Skill Development Functional Skills Applied Skills
  • Experiences being in the presence of animals.
  • Experiences seasons through sensory stories and/or educational visits.
  • Listens to stories about seasons.
  • Enjoys a sensory story about the seasons.
  • Listens to songs and rhymes about the seasons.
  • Experiences resources and activities relating to the natural world e.g. leaves, soil, plants, flowers
  • Listens to stories from a range of cultures and religions relating to animals and seasons e.g. the rich farmer,
  • Experience a range of celebrations and significant times.
  • Actively seeks to handle or touch animals.
  • Actively seeks to touch or handle objects found outside e.g. leaf, snow, flowers etc.
  • Actively explores sensory bins with a season’s focus.
  • Explore and respond to a range of activities / /media relating to celebrations and significant times.
  • Explore and respond to a range of activities / media / sensory stories about the natural world including animals and seasons
  • Uses tools for a purpose e.g. brush for a dogs fur, lead to take a dog for a walk etc.
  • Will adapt clothing to suit the season e.g. wellington boots in snow/rain. Understands the need for particular clothing based on the season/weather
  • Is able to name the seasons and is developing some awareness to the chronological order of seasons.
  • Actively participates in celebrations and significant events, able to name key words and give key features.
  • Is able to identify and name key features of the natural world including animals and seasons, using words such as rainbows, floods.
  • Explores various environments, observing animals and plants within them.
  • Can answer simple questions about animals observed and changes from season to season.
  • Can answer simple questions about seasons and shows an awareness of what season comes next or what came before e.g. autumn comes after summer.
  • Able to talk about celebrations and significant events in their own lives and identify symbols, artefacts etc. associated with the events.
  • Able to talk about and answer simple questions re how to care for animals / plants/ their natural world.
  • Looks for and labels animals and plants.
  • Able to talk about changing seasons.
  • Can explain differences and similarities in living things.
  • Able to talk about the change in seasons, noticing similarities and differences. e.g. they notice in the past there were no flowers and it was cold but now flowers are starting to grow and it is warmer.
  • Discuss, explain and answer questions re the importance and value of celebrations and significant events and how this makes them feel.
  • Discuss, explain and answer more complex questions re the importance of looking after / caring for all living things and the natural world and able to relate this to religious and cultural beliefs and practices, e.g. the signs and symbols for peace, the meaning of a rainbow, an olive branch

Culture & Communities Curriculum Scheme 2020-21

In History, by the end of KS1, pupils should:

Develop an awareness of the past, using common words and phrases relating to the passing of time. They should know where the people and events they study fit within a chronological framework and identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods. They should use a wide vocabulary of everyday historical terms. They should ask and answer questions, choosing and using parts of stories and other sources to show that they know and

understand key features of events. They should understand some of the ways in which we find out about the past and identify different ways in which it is represented.

In Geography, by the ned of KS1, pupils should:

Locational knowledge

  • Name and locate the world’s seven continents and five oceans
  • Name, locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas.

Place knowledge

  • Understand geographical similarities and differences through studying the human and physical geography of a small area of the United Kingdom, and of a small area in a contrasting non-European country

Human and physical geography

  • Identify seasonal and daily weather patterns in the United Kingdom and the location of hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles
  • Use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to:
    • Key physical features, including: beach, cliff, coast, forest, hill, mountain, sea, ocean, river, soil, valley, vegetation, season and weather
    • Key human features, including: city, town, village, factory, farm, house, office, port, harbour and shop

Geographical skills and fieldwork

  • Use world maps, atlases and globes to identify the United Kingdom and its countries, as well as the countries, continents and oceans studied at this key stage
  • Use simple compass directions (North, South, East and West) and locational and directional language [for example, near and far; left and right], to describe the location of features and routes on a map
  • Use aerial photographs and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features; devise a simple map; and use and construct basic symbols in a key
  • Use simple fieldwork and observational skills to study the geography of their school and its grounds and the key human and physical features of its surrounding environment.

In R.E. by the end of KS2, pupils should:

Recount outlines of some religious stories; retell religious stories and identify some religious beliefs and teachings; recognise features of religious life and practice; identify some religious practices, and know that some are characteristic of more than one religion; recognise some religious symbols and words; suggest meanings in religious symbols, language and stories.

Identify aspects of own experience and feelings, in religious material studied; respond sensitively to the experiences and feelings of others, including those with a faith; identify things they find interesting or puzzling, in religious materials studied; realise that some questions that cause people to wonder are difficult to answer; identify what is of value and concern to themselves, in religious material studied; respond sensitively to the values and concerns of others, including those with a faith, in relation to matters of right and wrong.

In Foreign Languages, in KS2, pupils should be taught to:

Pupils should be taught to:

  • learn the basics of a foreign language for example greetings, communication of choices and preferences, naming colours, numbers, body parts, object names, animals, weather etc.
  • listen attentively to spoken language and show understanding by joining in and responding
  • explore the patterns and sounds of language through songs and rhymes and link the spelling, sound and meaning of words
  • engage in conversations; ask and answer questions; express opinions and respond to those of others; seek clarification and help*
  • speak in sentences, using familiar vocabulary, phrases and basic language structures
  • develop accurate pronunciation and intonation so that others understand when they are reading aloud or using familiar words and phrases*
  • present ideas and information orally to a range of audiences*
  • read carefully and show understanding of words, phrases and simple writing
  • appreciate stories, songs, poems and rhymes in the language
  • broaden their vocabulary and develop their ability to understand new words that are introduced into familiar written material, including through using a dictionary
  • write phrases from memory, and adapt these to create new sentences, to express ideas clearly
  • describe people, places, things and actions orally* and in writing
  • understand basic grammar appropriate to the language being studied, including (where relevant): feminine, masculine and neuter forms and the conjugation of high-frequency verbs;
  • key features and patterns of the language; how to apply these, for instance, to build sentences; and how these differ from or are similar to English

The starred (*) content above will not be applicable to ancient languages.